Lectures

The ‘chronic’ lives of failing organs: afflictions of ambivalent care in Mexico

This article is part of the series:

Life has always been difficult, Maria del Rosario told me, but she coped. That was before all the sickness. When her mother’s kidneys began to fail, she felt traumatised, utterly overwhelmed. No matter what she or anyone else did to help, it was no good. Their lives simply fell apart.[i]

Maria, a single mother of two, lived in Balcones …

Lectures

African Immigrant Care Workers & COVID in the US: Their Fears, Protections, and Recalibrations

This article is part of the series:

The US healthcare system depends on the labor of immigrant healthcare professionals, a fact mainly unrecognized and unreported during the pandemic. Twenty-eight percent of physicians are foreign-born, as are 22 percent of nursing assistants (Batalova 2020). The immigrant professionals make up even more of the workforce in healthcare positions that are undervalued, in comparison to what is considered skilled medical …

Lectures

Covid-19 and global health, seen from France: the end of a “great divide”?

This article is part of the series:

Note — this text is an updated version of an article published in French by Analyse Opinion Critique (AOC) on April 3rd, 2020.

On March 13th, 2020, an aircraft lands at the airport in Rome and stops on the tarmac. Nine people get off the plane and immediately stop next to the jetbridge for a group …

Lectures

Austerity, Not COVID-19, Strains National Healthcare Systems

This article is part of the series:

Spain and Italy, two of the countries most affected early on by COVID-19, were also among the EU member-states that underwent severe and extended austerity measures following the last global economic recession. These measures significantly weakened publicly funded healthcare systems in both countries, and as it is particularly relevant to understanding the trajectories of pandemic, constrained public sector response. 

The …

Features

How Medicare For All Challenges our Ideas of Black Deservingness

The contemporary debate over healthcare in the United States revolves around an unstated but somewhat widely understood notion of what people deserve. The question of “deservingness” is particularly important when we hone in on the demographics of the American populace and think critically about who is currently underserved by the current medical system in the U.S., and who stands

Books

The Reproductive and Carceral Politics of Ambiguity

Jailcare: Finding the Safety Net for Women behind Bars

Carolyn Sufrin

University of California Press, 2017, 311 pages.

 

Jailcare sheds light on a dark place. The ethnography exposes how care emerges and is nurtured in spaces, like jail, that are not intuitively caring. Sufrin develops the concept of jailcare as a way to understand how jail, a violent and …