Features

Jean Oury and Clinique de La Borde: A Conversation with Camille Robcis

Jean Oury died on May 15, 2014.  The 300-word obituary written by Élisabeth Roudinesco for Le Monde was certainly proportionate to the awareness of the man and his work, but wholly unequal to his influence and reach within medical thought and intellectual life in France for more than a half century.  Oury, a psychiatrist and psychoanalyst, created a legacy along …

In the Journals

Psychiatrised Children and their Rights: Global Perspectives — A Special Issue of Children & Society

The current issue of Children & Society is a special issue entitled “Psychiatrised Children and their Rights: Global Perspectives.” The issue is edited by Brenda A. LeFrançois and Vicki Coppock, who introduce it in their piece, “Psychiatrised Children and their Rights: Starting the Conversation.” The rest of the issue’s abstracts are as follows:

Sick or Sad?

Books

Stefan Ecks’ Eating Drugs

Eating Drugs: Psychopharmaceutical Pluralism in India

by Stefan Ecks

New York University Press, 2013. 233 pp.

 

In Stefan Ecks’ poignant ethnography, he illuminates the relationship between digestive health and mental health in Calcutta, paying particular attention to the contributions this relationship has made to a pharmaceuticalized India. He traces three medical systems––Ayurvedic, homeopathic and allopathic––as they each locate the …

Announcements

Plasticity and Pathology: A Workshop – UC Berkeley, Rhetoric Department – April 11 & 12, 2014

Plasticity and Pathology: History and Theory of Neural Subjects

Organized by David Bates and Nima Bassiri

Friday, April 11

1.00 pm Welcome from Workshop Organizers (David Bates and Nima Bassiri)

1.15 – 3.15 pm Session One

Laura Salisbury (English, Exeter)
TBA [On narrative and neural subjects in Luria]

Nima Bassiri (ACLS Fellow, Literature and Neuroscience, Duke)
“Epileptic Insanity and Personal …

Features

Manual

While training in psychiatry, I frequently heard mental-health practitioners refer to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) as our profession’s “diagnostic bible.”  The DSM, of course, is the text produced by a cabal of psychiatric experts that defines the parameters of mental illness and, by extension, mental health.  It textually conveys the now commonplace assumption that psychiatry works through systems …