Lectures

SPA Panel on Political Subjectivity – April 1, 2011, Santa Monica

This article is part of the series:
The biennial meeting of the Society for Psychological Anthropology this year took place from March 31 to April 3 in Santa Monica, California. Below you will find audio recordings of a panel myself and Byron Good had put together on the topic of political subjectivity. Terry O’Nell requested that her presentation not be published here due to ethical concerns regarding
AnnouncementsLectures

Biological and cultural contexts of schizophrenia: a discussion panel

A few days ago I mentioned that summaries of the panels from January’s Foundation for Psychocultural Research (FPR)-UCLA conference on Cultural and Biological Contexts of Psychiatric Disorder were being posted on the FPR blog.  Now Constance Cummings, Project Director at the FPR, has begun uploading videos of some events to the FPR’s YouTube page.

The first of …

Features

Psychoanalytic metaphors and mythical medical realities in Claude Lévi-Strauss’s contribution to medical anthropology

There are few subject areas in anthropology untouched by the seminal thought of the late Professor Claude Lévi-Strauss. Though he published only two or three essays concerned expressly with medical subject matter, his theorization in those places of the role of myth and shamanistic authority in symbolic/magical healing opened up questions with lasting significance. I would like to briefly review …

Features

The (Lacanian) unconscious: structure and negative ontology

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As I pointed out in the last post, Lacan’s successful juxtaposition of a psychoanalytic model of the subject with (post)structuralist approaches to meaning and linguistic organization has contributed immensely to the contemporary understanding of the subjective as political. At the same time, however, a significant aspect of Lacan’s ‘structural’ conception of the subject which has fundamental relevance to our …

Features

The Unconscious: Metaphor and Metonymy

This article is part of the series:

In his 1930s text, ‘the structure of the unconscious,’ Freud described the unconscious as “a fact without parallel, which defies all explanation or description.” Construed through this very mystifying, if not metaphysical, perspective, the unconscious then remained to be the single most unknowable and more or less untheorizable element of all observable features of human psychology, and of the psychoanalytic …