Features

Subjectivity at the Intersection of Metaphoric and Metonymic Functions

This article is part of the series:

I have been intending to return and continue the two lines of discussion I had started earlier concerning the broader theme of political subjectivity and the more specific issue of metonymic and metaphoric functions for a while now, but too many things stopped me from doing so.  Thankfully a recent comment/question by Malte about my earlier posting on metaphor and …

Lectures

The Culture, Mind and Brain Conference and Tanya Luhrmann on “Hearing Voices in Accra and Chennai”

This past Friday and Saturday the Foundation for Psychocultural Research held its Fifth interdisciplinary conference on Culture, Mind and Brain: Emerging Concepts, Methods, Applications.  I’m sad to have missed it, as it was clearly a very exciting event, bringing together key researchers from neuroscience, biocultural anthropology, cultural psychology, behavioral biology and other disciplines to discuss — in very concrete …

Teaching Resources

Resources for teaching medical anthropology

With the school year approaching, many academic blogs have featured posts about teaching.  We’ve run a few of these over the past years, including a number of syllabi related to medical anthropology.  You can see them all by clicking on the “Teaching Resources” category in the sidebar, but I’ve also gathered the best of them here — …

In the Journals

“Psychological Anthropology and Adolescent Well-Being”: A Special Journal Issue

The December 2011 issue of Ethos is a special issue, entitled “Psychological Anthropology and Adolescent Well-Being: Steps toward Bridging Research, Policy, and Practice.” Building upon recent interest in policy- and practice-based collaboration among the psychological anthropology community, the issue enacts such collaboration by pairing original research articles with commentary by policy experts and practitioners. As the editors, Eileen …

Features

Toward an Anthropological Theory of Mind (AToM): Selves

This article is part of the series:

Last month a small, international gathering of twenty-seven anthropologists and psychologists took place at the Stanford Humanities Center, organized by Stanford anthropology professor Tanya Luhrmann and Culture and Mind postdoctoral fellows Julia Cassaniti, and Jocelyn Marrow, with financial support from the Robert Lemelson Foundation. (See end of post for full list of participants.

The session on “selves” in …

Features

Summary: Toward an Anthropological Theory of Mind (AToM)

This article is part of the series:

This is the first in a series of posts covering cross-disciplinary research on theory of mind. The series is being posted simultaneously at Somatosphere and at the Foundation for Psychocultural Research (FPR) blog.

 

Last weekend a small, international gathering of twenty-seven anthropologists and psychologists took place at the Stanford Humanities Center, organized by Stanford anthropology professor Tanya Luhrmann