Books

Johan Asplund’s The Elementary Forms of Social Life

This article is part of the series:

Det sociala livets elementara formerDet sociala livets elementära former [The Elementary Forms of Social Life]

by Johan Asplund

Bokförlaget Korpen, 1987/2000, 268 pages.

 

Johan Asplund, whose work has been rather underrepresented in the international academic arena, is frequently seen as the “father” of contemporary Swedish social psychology. Remarkably productive, Asplund gained popularity in the 1970–1980s, and his books are still widely used in …

Features

Autism, sociality, and human nature

There are, I believe, a few reasons to suppose that autism is a particularly fascinating area to be studying at the moment.  What are those reasons?  Firstly, prevalence rates of autism have soared in recent decades, from 1:2,500 in 1978 to around 1:100 today: a staggering 25-fold increase.  Secondly, and simultaneously, the nature of those receiving a diagnosis of autism …

Features

Jean Oury and Clinique de La Borde: A Conversation with Camille Robcis

Jean Oury died on May 15, 2014.  The 300-word obituary written by Élisabeth Roudinesco for Le Monde was certainly proportionate to the awareness of the man and his work, but wholly unequal to his influence and reach within medical thought and intellectual life in France for more than a half century.  Oury, a psychiatrist and psychoanalyst, created a legacy along …

Features

Table

 

Early anthropological experiments depended on tables to hold their equipment steady, at eye level, and off the ground. Photographs from the Cambridge Anthropological Expedition to the Torres Straits in 1898 make it clear that tables played an important role in the psychological experiments conducted by the anthropologists.

WHR Rivers and Torres Strait Islander with the color wheel. In Richards,

Books

Beyond Chronicity and Culpability: Toward A New Ethic of Care

This article is part of the series:

A Commentary on Angela Garcia’s The Pastoral Clinic: Addiction and Dispossession along the Rio Grande
University of California Press, 2010
264 pp., US$ 28.95 (paperback)

In his sprawling and widely lauded novel Infinite Jest, the late David Foster Wallace offers a riveting portrait of modern addiction. Scenes of the banality of Twelve-Step programs drew on Wallace’s own experiences in …

BooksFeatures

Top of the heap: Junko Kitanaka

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For the latest installment of “Top of the heap,” Junko Kitanaka, who teaches anthropology at Keio University in Tokyo, told us about a new book she’s been reading and some key older texts she’s returned to recently.

Junko Kitanaka

As I’ve been thinking about the psychiatrization of childhood this past year, one book has stood out among those that I’ve …