Features

The Banality of Lost Guns: Producing Null Data Sets

This article is part of the series:

On the evening of June 6, 2016, a man with a concealed carry permit misplaced his loaded 9mm Kahr handgun in the middle of a park filled with kids during the opening night of my town’s recreational soccer league.[1] A parent found the gun lying in the grass under a stand of pine trees a few yards from a …

Books

Nadine Ehlers and Leslie R. Hinkson’s Subprime Health: Debt and Race in US Medicine

Subprime Health: Debt and Race in US Medicine

Nadine Ehlers and Leslie R. Hinkson (editors)

University of Minnesota Press, 2017. 256 pages

 

“The focus on race in medicine and the hard sciences,” write Nadine Ehlers and Leslie R. Hinkson in their introduction to the new edited volume Subprime Health: Debt and Race in US Medicine, “creates unintended consequences—forms …

Features

We Need to Talk About “Gun Violence”: Reflections on Terminology and Contexts of Violence

This article is part of the series:

Among the many political challenges of our time, gun violence in America has emerged as one of the most divisive. A retreat into partisan communities prevents us from considering the complexity or lived experiences of our political opponents. The fears and insecurities of each group are projected onto the other. Both consume media that influences how they are likely to …

Books

On Thinking with People and their Escapes: A Review of Unfinished through Storytelling

Unfinished: The Anthropology of Becoming

João Biehl and Peter Locke, editors

Duke University Press, 2017. 400 pages.

 

If hierarchy is the key to sociological knowledge production, what might it mean to refuse the hierarchy of intelligences between those who know the world, those who can allegedly theorize the world, and those who have to survive the world, or …

Features

Reaching Out, Looking In: On Research, Refusal, and Responsibility

This article is part of the series:

The papers in this series, “Critical Histories, Activist Futures,” have captured some of the exciting conversations that took place during a conference titled “Critical Histories, Activist Futures: Science, Medicine, and Racial Violence,” which was held at Yale University in February 2017. As my colleague Sarah M. Pickman has explained, the conference was intended to create a space for …

Features

Blue binders of white donors: sorting race out in South African IVF

This article is part of the series:

Miracle babies. The microscopic enchantments of embryos. The image of a woman holding that much-desired infant. In vitro fertilization, or IVF, is replete with awe-inducing imagery, often bordering on the near religious. Kylie, an embryologist I interviewed in Cape Town described the images of IVF as part of the inspiring stories that drew her into the field: “I watched a …