Lectures

(Dis)continuities in cancer care: An ethnographic approximation to practices of disease stratification

Background:

Disease stratification practices have long been used as a means to produce and make sense of  cancer, distinguishing ‘types’, tumour development stages, and even patients’ sociodemographic profiles. However, interest in stratification; that is, the process of dividing oncology populations into clinically meaningful subtypes, has been re-invigorated by two recent developments in medicine and healthcare. First, an increased awareness of …

Web Roundups

Web Roundup: Beyond Using More Female Rats: Gender Disparities in Biomedicine

Recently, physicians, public health experts, and anthropologists (among others) have pointed to a prevalence of gender, class, race, age, and ethnic bias in biomedical research and the specific ways in which knowledges about bodies are created and reproduced in biomedicine.

In the 19th century, when the long-standing idea of women’s inferiority was brought into question more …

Web Roundups

Web Roundup: CRISPR Babies and Bioethics

In late November, He Jiankui, a scientist in China, announced that he had created the first “CRISPR babies,” meaning that he performed germ-line genome edits on human embryos, which were implanted through in vitro fertilization (IVF), and has now resulted the birth of twin girls. He used CRISPR-Cas9, a genome editing technology that can target DNA at precise

Books

After and Beyond the Genome: Taking Postgenomics Seriously

The Postgenomic Condition: Ethics, Justice, and Knowledge after the Genome

Jenny Reardon

University of Chicago Press, 2017, 304 pages.

 

Genetics: A Situated View      

How enduring is the love affair between our societies and genetics (today genomics)? And what is the role of critical social science in undermining or, rather, mirroring the power of this romance? And what do we

Features

Laboratory capacity building and the open hardware movement

This article is part of the series:

Through my work in African laboratories I am regularly made aware of the challenging equipment shortages faced by research laboratories in many low/middle-income countries (LMICs). This extends far beyond the absence of “state-of-the-art” equipment and shiny, new models regularly produced by commercial companies. These shortages include the availability of what would normally be considered ubiquitous laboratory equipment – PCR machines, …

Web Roundups

Web Roundup: In the clouds

As I’m sure many of you saw, this month started with the successful launch of SpaceX’s Falcon Heavy, giving a boost (sorry) to privatized space travel, and providing us all with a few days of very strange photos. On that note, here is a Web Roundup about flight, flying objects, and clouds of all kinds.

Staying with the …