Features

On the pragmatics and politics of collaborative work between the social and life sciences

For scholars in the humanities and interpretive social sciences, it sometimes seems like hardly a day goes by without some kind of exhortation towards ‘interdisciplinarity’ – a trend that has only become more pronounced during the ongoing realignment of public higher education in many countries. ‘The humanities are being driven into defensive positions,’ wrote the vice-provost of University College London …

Features

Robert Castel – 1933 – 2013

A French-language version of this piece, written by Nicolas Henckes, first appeared on h-madness.  It has been translated into English by Anne Lovell and is also being posted simultaneously on h-madness.

French sociologist and historian Robert Castel passed away on March 12, 2013, at the age of 79. An important figure in French intellectual life over the past …

Features

Longing for Sleep: Assessing the Place of Sleep in the 21st Century – Part 3

This article is part of the series:

Sleep has been in the news for the past decade or so as a matter of growing concern. Along with this popular, medical and scientific attention, social scientists have been increasingly interested in sleep as an object or process of study. The first major sociological book published on sleep was Simon Williams’ Sleep and Society (Routledge, 2005), after which

Features

Longing for Sleep: Assessing the Place of Sleep in the 21st Century – Part 2

This article is part of the series:

Sleep has been in the news for the past decade or so as a matter of growing concern. Along with this popular, medical and scientific attention, social scientists have been increasingly interested in sleep as an object or process of study. The first major sociological book published on sleep was Simon Williams’ Sleep and Society (Routledge, 2005), after which

Features

Longing for Sleep: Assessing the Place of Sleep in the 21st Century – Part 1

This article is part of the series:

Sleep has been in the news for the past decade or so as a matter of growing concern. Along with this popular, medical and scientific attention, social scientists have been increasingly interested in sleep as an object or process of study. The first major sociological book published on sleep was Simon Williams’ Sleep and Society (Routledge, 2005), after which

In the Journals

In the Journals – August 2012

Admittedly a bit belated, but just in time for the start of fall semesters and quarters, here is the journal roundup for this August. Without further ado…

In American Ethnologist, Susan Greenhalgh and Peter Benson conduct a brief call-and-response in Biopolitics and the “War on Fat”, an AE forum:

Weighty subjects: The biopolitics of the U.S. war on fat