Features

Putting Science in its Place

In some corners of anthropology, it has been said that science studies lacks a robust sense of place. But many capable ethnographers have brought labs, hospital suites, and production facilities to life, giving readers a granular sense for what distinguishes these sites from other milieux. What, precisely, might be missing? Consider the word “place.” As science studies scholars have repeatedly …

Books

Stefan Ecks’ Eating Drugs

Eating Drugs: Psychopharmaceutical Pluralism in India

by Stefan Ecks

New York University Press, 2013. 233 pp.

 

In Stefan Ecks’ poignant ethnography, he illuminates the relationship between digestive health and mental health in Calcutta, paying particular attention to the contributions this relationship has made to a pharmaceuticalized India. He traces three medical systems––Ayurvedic, homeopathic and allopathic––as they each locate the …

Features

(Dis)harmonious Socialities: Deaf multi-level marketing participation in India

In this post, I want to think about what the popularity of multi-level marketing businesses among Indian Sign Language-using deaf Indians means for how anthropologists and other social scientists analyze deaf worlds. In the current political economic moment, many deaf Indians are turning to multi-level marketing businesses for both livelihood and for imagining new deaf futures. There is the sense …

Features

From disability stigma to disability value: Notes from research on disability in urban India

I am a medical anthropologist who researches deaf and disabled peoples’ social, moral, and economic practices in urban India. When speaking with colleagues and friends in the United States and elsewhere, I am invariably asked about the existence of stigma in India and whether deaf or disabled people are treated as stigmatized. People also ask me about pollution and if …

Features

Springtime in Kashmir: A Tale of Two Protests

The Kashmir valley experienced a painful, unsuccessful armed movement for national self-determination against Indian rule from 1989-2002. [1]  While a ceasefire was declared in 2002, Kashmir’s political future continues to be mired in uncertainty, caught between the national interests of Pakistan and India.   Despite the end of the armed struggle, the vast majority of Kashmiris aspire to the yet-unfulfilled promise

Books

Book review: Health Transitions and the Double Disease Burden in Asia and the Pacific

Health Transitions and the Double Disease Burden in Asia and the Pacific: Histories of Responses to Non-Communicable and Communicable Diseases

Edited by Milton J. Lewis and Kerrie L. MacPherson

Routledge Publishing, 2012

322 pp., US $155.00 (hardback)

 

The phrase “double disease burden” is one that has been increasingly used in modern public health discussions.  The concept applies to “developing …