Features

Introduction: The First Thousand Days of Life

This article is part of the series:

(On behalf of the First Thousand Days Research Group (University of Cape Town))

“Good nutrition in the first 1000 days between a woman’s pregnancy and her child’s second birthday sets the foundation for all the days that follow.”

— ThousandDays.org

“The First 1,000 Days of being a parent are now accepted to be the most significant in a child’s development.”

Books

Annemarie Jutel’s Putting a Name to It: Diagnosis in Contemporary Society

31mSK7WRhXL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_Putting a Name to It: Diagnosis in Contemporary Society

by Annemarie Jutel

Johns Hopkins University Press, 2011. 175 pages.

 

When we treat diagnosis as simply a medical issue, we mask the tremendous social power involved in putting a name to human suffering. When we transform phenomenological experiences into discrete labels and then treat those labels as reality, we cram …

Features

Complex Carbohydrates: On the relevance of ethnography in nutrition education

This post was contributed by Emily Yates-Doerr (University of Amsterdam)

I thank Somatosphere for inviting me to submit to their blog. I am in the process of completing my book manuscript: The Weight of the Body: Changing Ideals of Fatness, Nourishment and Health in Guatemala. My entry for this blog does not come directly from material included in the book,

In the Journals

Biomedical Conventions and Regulatory Objectivity in Social Studies of Science

The latest issue of Social Studies of Science is a special issue on “Biomedical Conventions and Regulatory Objectivity,” edited by several members of the department where I’m currently based (McGill’s Social Studies of Medicine)–Alberto Cambrosio, Thomas Schlich, and George Weisz, and Peter Keating of the University of Quebec at Montreal.

Here’s the abstract