Features

Subjectivity After the Subject

This article is part of the series:

One: Whither The Subject?

It has been exactly 8 years since I wrote the introductory installment of a mini-series on political subjectivity for Somatosphere. When I wrote on political subjectivity at the time, aside from exploring and communicating ideas, a good part of my agenda was to help propagate the concept of political subjectivity in cultural and medical anthropology …

Web Roundups

Mind, Consciousness, and Artificial Intelligence

This month’s web roundup comes through a bit late – paradoxically- due to technical difficulties (my computer died!). Although I will be able to recover most of my files, the past days were a reminder of just how much we depend on technology to go about our lives, including saving our work, our thoughts and ideas… which leads me directly …

BooksFeatures

Book Forum—Lisa Stevenson’s “Life Beside Itself: Imagining Care in the Canadian Arctic”

This article is part of the series:

life beside itself cover

For our latest installment in the book forum series, we bring you a series of commentaries on Lisa Stevenson’s Life Beside Itself: Imagining Care in the Canadian Arctic (University of California Press, 2014).  As it takes us across the conceptual grounds of governance, (post)colonialism, biopolitics, violence, and suicide, this book illuminates care as an object of study in a way …

Features

Varieties of Tulpa Experiences: Sentient Imaginary Friends, Embodied Joint Attention, and Hypnotic Sociality in a Wired World

“The intention to know”, from Annie Besant & C. W. Leadbeater (1901) Thought-Forms. London: The Theosophical Publishing House.

“The intention to know”, from Annie Besant & C. W. Leadbeater (1901) Thought-Forms. London: The Theosophical Publishing House.

Introduction

This article presents a summary and discussion of key findings from ten months of experimental cyberethnography among tulpamancers.[i] Tulpas, a term reportedly borrowed from Tibetan Buddhism, are imaginary companions who are said to have achieved full sentience after …

Books

Terrence Deacon’s Incomplete Nature

Incomplete Nature: How Mind Emerged From Matter

By Terrence Deacon

W. W. Norton, 2013, paperback, 627 pages.

Incomplete Nature is a big book, literally and conceptually. The subtitle “How Mind Emerged From Matter” hints of a grand synthesis and Terrence Deacon, chair of University of California–Berkeley’s anthropology department, presents a dense argument which defies usual labels. The result is part …

In the Journals

Special issue of Clio’s Psyche on “Psychoanalytic Anthropology”

I recently edited a special issue of Clio’s Psyche on “psychoanalytic anthropology” which may be of interest to Somatosphere’s readers.  The issue contains 18 brief and accessible articles on a range of approaches in psychoanalytic anthropology as well as personal reflections from anthropologists working from a variety of psychoanalytic perspectives, including contributions from Robert LeVine, Ellen Corin, Howard Stein, and …