Books

Etienne Balibar’s Identity and Difference

Identity and Difference:
John Locke and the Invention of Consciousness

By Etienne Balibar
Introduction by Stella Sanford
Translated by Warren Montag
Verso, 2013, 158 pp

Multi-layered, multi-dimensional, and in important respects multi-lingual, the English edition of Etienne Balibar’s groundbreaking Identity and Difference presents a layered approach to one of the most significant philosophical debates of our age.

John Locke’s Essay

Books

The Clinic (Inside Out): and (a series of) Elsewhere(s)

This article is part of the series:

The Clinic and Elsewhere: Addiction, Adolescents, and the Afterlife of Therapy

by Todd Meyers

University of Washington Press, 2013
172 pp, US$25.00 (paperback)

The Clinic and Elsewhere is an extremely well-crafted account of the methodological, conceptual and narrative problems of knowledge and life of the afterlife of drug therapy.  Todd Meyers gives expressive form to the attempt to cure, to …

Books

Kenneth MacLeish’s Making War at Fort Hood

This article is part of the series:

Making War at Fort Hood: Life and Uncertainty in a Military Community

by Kenneth T. MacLeish

Princeton University Press, 2013. 280 pp, US$ 29.95 (Cloth)

 

“They didn’t get into the details of real life, the little things,” a troubled U.S. war veteran criticizes a PTSD primer for returning soldiers in Kenneth MacLeish’s ethnography Making War at Fort Hood.  …

Teaching Resources

Illness and subjectivity: a syllabus

When I was in graduate school during the early 2000s, there was a lot of discussion taking place about “subjectivity.”  I found much of this conversation deeply confusing, in part because so little was being done pedagogically to sort out the work being carried out under this term from research under a number of cognate rubrics such as “self” and …

Books

Addiction Trajectories: an interview

Will Garriott and I have an interview up at Points: the blog of the Alcohol and Drugs History Society in which we discuss our recently released edited volume Addiction Trajectories (Duke UP, 2013).  The Points editors always ask their interviewees to first describe their book “in terms your bartender could understand” and here’s our attempt:

In Addiction Trajectories we wanted

Web Roundups

Web Roundup: Reading Literature as Medical Anthropologists

This month’s Web Round-up gathers reviews of recent works of fiction that engage medical anthropological themes. You’ll also find some links to writings about anthropology and fiction from around the blogosphere. This slant toward literary subject matter is inspired by the recent addition of the Top of the Heap column to the Somatosphere family.

Fiction (or memoir) is often the …