Web Roundups

Web Roundup: Public, Intimate Spaces (Bathrooms & Brains)

Bounded categories and category-bounded spaces are always of interest. This month, there were salient discussions of two such spaces: the (gendered) public bathroom and the brain.


Public bathrooms as dichotomously-gendered spaces have been in the news this month. Controversy and legal action have been in the news across the United States, with schools at the forefront of debate (…


When Research Bleeds into Real Life: Studying Reproductive Ageing while Ageing Reproductively

In a book chapter addressing feminist research methods and women’s health and healing, Rayna Rapp (1999) wrote about the complicated ways in which everyday life is embroiled in feminist research methods. She was speaking about how her own experience with amniocentesis was situated in her now canonical, multi-sited ethnography of this technology, and the corresponding challenges that arise when doing …


Summer Roundup: Inhabitable Worlds, Part Two

Continuing our summer roundups, today we are highlighting a second set of essays from our Inhabitable Worlds series, brought to us by editors Michele Friedner and Emily Cohen. Inhabitable Worlds is a series that examines the theoretical tools and approaches that scholars bring to the study of disability in the social sciences and humanities.



Regulations versus hierarchies: Commuters


Book Forum — Christian McMillen’s “Discovering Tuberculosis”

This article is part of the series:



Christian McMillen’s Discovering Tuberculosis is many things, but mostly it is an account of failure.  The book is a story of disease control in the twentieth century that is anything but controlled.  McMillen gives needed attention to problems of the past that find themselves – unexpectedly, dangerously – occupying our present moment (though it should be made clear from …

Web Roundups

Web Roundup: Biohacking, BioArt, and other Playful Abominations

These days, it is fun to “hack” almost everything. You can hack your life, you can hack your home, and you can even hack your period. So, as the web continues to grow more material on synthetic biology, let us turn once again to the world of biohacking.

A particularly interesting piece considers the possibility of …


Limn issue no. 5: Ebola’s Ecologies

This article is part of the series:

FrontCover6-220x284We’d like to help spread the word about the recent issue of Limn, edited by Andrew Lakoff, Stephen J. Collier and Christopher Kelty, now in print.

From the editors:

“This issue of Limn on “Ebola’s Ecologies” examines how the 2014 Ebola outbreak has put the norms, practices, and institutional logics of global health into question, and examines the new assemblages …