Features

Digital exclusions: mental health and digital life

This article is part of the series:

We are closing our series with a podcast that turns to the absences and missing voices emerging alongside Digital Psy; the lifeworlds and experiences of those not interpellated into digital care. In this podcast, we explore the notion of “digital exclusion”, commonly used to describe the challenges of digital participation in terms of a lack of devices or skills. Here, we approach digital exclusion as an empirical artifact and trace its edge through policy, care provision, technology design, and the everyday.  

The first part focuses on the UK, where we talk to a disability activist and share the highlights of a “theatre of the oppressed” workshop that took place in London. Collectively we produced artistic responses to the theme “digital exclusion” with people who experienced barriers to …

Lectures

Mediated Intimacies: Teletherapy and the Changing Face of American Mental Healthcare

This article is part of the series:

“Hello?  Hello? Can you hear me?” 

“I can, but your head is cut off.  I just see your neck.  Can you hear me?”

“Yeah, yeah, I hear you.  There, is that better?  Can you see me now?” 

“Yes, that’s good.”

“Ok, good.  I’m glad I have a head.” 

“Me, too–it makes things much easier.  How have things been for you?”

Such is the awkward start to …

Lectures

Corpses in the street, psychologist on the phone: Telepsychology, neoliberalism and Covid-19 in Ecuador

This article is part of the series:
Pavel Égüez, “Cuarentena (Quarantine)” (2020), Oil paint on cardboard.

In March 2020, the health and funerary system collapsed in Guayaquil. The largest city in Ecuador was one of the places most affected by Covid-19 in Latin America, perhaps even the world (Benítez et al., 2020; The New York Times, 2020). During the first weeks of the crisis, crude images of …

Features

Internet-Based Access to PrEP in the U.S.: A “Critically Applied” Approach and the Symbolic Effects of a Clinical-Technological Assemblage

This article is part of the series:

Introduction

“I‘d been trying to get PrEP through my physician at the time, and …I had to print up all these studies and all the prescription information because my doctor was like, ‘Well, you don’t have HIV.’ And I’m like, ‘I know. That’s the point. I don’t want to get it.’ And he’s like, ‘Well, [Truvada] is not for that.’

Features

Medical Imaginaries and Technological Futures: Transformations of Subjectivities in Biomedicine

This report highlights the activities of the Science, Technology and Medicine Interest Group (one of several special interest groups affiliated with the Society for Medical Anthropology (SMA)) at the 2011 Annual Meetings of the Society for the Social Studies of Science (4S) conference in Cleveland, OH in early November. Within the broader structure of the SMA, STM promotes the anthropological …