Books

Top of the heap: Ken MacLeish

This article is part of the series:

In today’s “Top of the heap,” Ken MacLeish, Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Medicine, Health and Society at Vanderbilt University, takes us into the world of war (and post-war) memoir, fiction and ethnography, also introducing us to some conceptual texts he’s been thinking with.

Ken MacLeish

Danny Hoffman, The War Machines: Young Men and Violence in Sierra Leone and Liberia

Books

Erin Finley’s Fields of Combat

Fields of Combat: Understanding PTSD among veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan

By Erin P. Finley

Cornell University Press, 2012. 240pp.

 

Finley’s portrayal of the difficulties of soldiers returning from Afghanistan and Iraq elegantly interweaves narratives and analysis. Drawing on 20 months of ethnographic fieldwork in San Antonio, Texas, involving 133 study participants (62 of which were veterans), Finley conveys …

Books

Beyond Chronicity and Culpability: Toward A New Ethic of Care

This article is part of the series:

A Commentary on Angela Garcia’s The Pastoral Clinic: Addiction and Dispossession along the Rio Grande
University of California Press, 2010
264 pp., US$ 28.95 (paperback)

In his sprawling and widely lauded novel Infinite Jest, the late David Foster Wallace offers a riveting portrait of modern addiction. Scenes of the banality of Twelve-Step programs drew on Wallace’s own experiences in …

Books

Kenneth MacLeish’s Making War at Fort Hood

This article is part of the series:

Making War at Fort Hood: Life and Uncertainty in a Military Community

by Kenneth T. MacLeish

Princeton University Press, 2013. 280 pp, US$ 29.95 (Cloth)

 

“They didn’t get into the details of real life, the little things,” a troubled U.S. war veteran criticizes a PTSD primer for returning soldiers in Kenneth MacLeish’s ethnography Making War at Fort Hood.  …

Features

War Death and Epidemiological Imagination

During the recent government shutdown, denial of the “death gratuity” to families of recently deceased veterans of the war in Afghanistan allowed people on both sides of a glaring political divide to condemn an unacceptable form of abandonment. Even in a climate of austerity, war deaths and injuries carry unquestioned obligations. It would seem that determining which fatalities fall into …

Books

Catherine Malabou’s The New Wounded: From Neurosis to Brain Damage

The New Wounded: From Neurosis to Brain Damage

by Catherine Malabou

Fordham University Press, 2012. Translated by Steven Miller. 249 pages, US$32.00, paperback


I. Unrecognizable Subjects and the Irruption of Trauma

“You know who my mother was?” a voice asks from off-screen. The elderly woman shakes her head.

“You…You are my mother,” the interviewer replies.

“How can I really be