FeaturesLectures

Reshaping the bulimic self

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The current clinical and social explanations of bulimia in the United Kingdom are based upon two premises: 1) that bulimia is a derivative of anorexia, and 2) that it is a hierarchically “lower” disorder, meaning that it is worse to have than anorexia. These explanations of bulimia revolve around the concept of “control” and conceptualize a particular bulimic “subjectivity.” By …

Lectures

Fit for Purpose? Prime Minister Johnson’s Two Bodies and the UK Better Health Strategy

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Amongst the UK’s current Conservative Government, rhetorically invoking the body politic is common practice. For example, in 2019 Number 10 Special Advisor Dominic Cummings argued that a European reformist faction within the Tory party “should be treated like a metastasising tumour and excised from the UK body politic” while UK Prime Minister (PM) Boris Johnson deployed the metaphor as a …

Lectures

“The Hostel saved me, really” – addiction and homelessness under Covid-19

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When I did my second shift of volunteering at the Hostel[1], new rules were already in place: ‘stay-at-home’ orders had been issued and were enforceable (if not necessarily enforced) by police all over the UK. I arrived to prepare dinner for all the guests and was surprised to see so many people in the Lounge, the main hang-out area for everyone at the Hostel, waiting …

Lectures

Caring in the time of corona: Technological possibilities and limitations

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“Now is the moment to put the failures of the past behind us, and set our sights on the NHS being the most cutting-edge system in the world for the use of technology to improve our health, make our lives easier, and make money go further, harnessing the amazing explosion of innovation that the connection of billions of minds through

Lectures

Lockdowns save, lockdowns kill: Valuing life after coronashock

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The scale and severity of the coronavirus pandemic is a shock to health systems. It is a shock to economies and governments. It is also a shock to the life sciences, which were meant to anticipate a pandemic of this magnitude, but failed to do so. The “life sciences” in question are virology, epidemiology, biomedicine and pharmacology. But the social, …

Lectures

Covid-19: Bringing the social back in

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The impact of changes – social and medical – brought about by Covid-19 will not be known for some time. So far, in the UK at least, numbers have dominated public debate, with a warning that up to 500,000 people could die, reducing to around 20,000 with social distancing. Much has been made of the public response, with complaints of …