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Abou Farman’s On Not Dying: Secular Immortality in the Age of Technoscience

On Not Dying: Secular Immortality in the Age of Technoscience

Abou Farman

University of Minnesota Press, 2020. 360 pages. 

Max More, a trained philosopher and the present Ambassador and President Emeritus of the Alcor Life Extension Foundation, is of the opinion that most of us are caught in a “deathist”[1] trap. Aubrey de Grey, a noted gerontologist whose presence …

Lectures

Africa, the Cutting Edge for Health Care: Lessons from The Continent for the U.S. during COVID-19

This article is part of the series:

While the United States is often celebrated as a global leader in health expertise, it currently leads the world in COVID-19 infections and deaths. African countries, often considered under-resourced and underprepared, have proven far more successful in responding to the global pandemic. The Center for Health Security at Johns Hopkins School of Public Health and the Nuclear Threat Initiative created …

Lectures

African Immigrant Care Workers & COVID in the US: Their Fears, Protections, and Recalibrations

This article is part of the series:

The US healthcare system depends on the labor of immigrant healthcare professionals, a fact mainly unrecognized and unreported during the pandemic. Twenty-eight percent of physicians are foreign-born, as are 22 percent of nursing assistants (Batalova 2020). The immigrant professionals make up even more of the workforce in healthcare positions that are undervalued, in comparison to what is considered skilled medical …

Lectures

The Third Choice: Suicide Hotlines, Psychiatry, and the Police

This article is part of the series:

With Covid-19 showing no sign of abating, mental health care (from ongoing therapy to helplines) continues to be an important site of treatment for many Americans. While traditional therapy has continued to be prohibitively expensive for most, teletherapy has been covered by most major health insurance companies since the early days of the pandemic and is currently free for …

Lectures

Staying (at Home) with Brain Fog: “Un-witting” Patient Activism

This article is part of the series:


Scene 1: It’s Sunday afternoon, around one o’clock, and a group of a dozen or so people log onto a video call from their apartments. Occasionally someone’s cat will walk into the frame, obscuring the camera, or a deliveryman will ring the buzzer, interrupting the flow of conversation. But mostly, what we see of each other are scenes of domestic

Lectures

The ‘truth’ about ALS: Reconciling bias, motives, and etiological gaps

This article is part of the series:

In February of 2019, I was giving a talk in New Haven, Connecticut. My paper was an overview of my research, titled “Is It a ‘White Disease’? ALS, Race, and Suffering in St. Louis, MO.” I closed with an ethnographic vignette from a key informant, Tyrell, whose brother had died from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) three years prior, after being …