Lectures

Enlisted Laborers of Public Health: overlaps in the work of soldiers in historical perspective

This article is part of the series:

In April, a friend relayed her experience of getting a test for COVID-19 at a drive-through site at a university in Rhode Island, describing “dozens of camouflaged National Guard soldiers directing grim-faced drivers.” After more than 12 days of persistent fever and two conversations with her doctor, she reported as instructed, alone in her car, and held her ID up …

Lectures

On Vulnerability, Resilience, and Age: Older Americans Reflect on the Pandemic

This article is part of the series:

Every morning, Americans wake up to fresh news of the heavy toll the coronavirus pandemic is exerting upon vulnerable older people—from the likelihood of developing a more severe form of Covid-19, to the risks of isolation and mental health problems as they give up social contacts in order to stay safe. We read essays like the New York Times opinion

Lectures

“Out of options”: The implications of COVID-19 for hospitalized patients with cognitive impairment

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“How about a walk today?” I asked Mr. T each morning I arrived to the hospital, visiting him on my morning rounds. Mr T. grinned back at me from the edge of his bed beneath his bright red veteran’s baseball cap, a sharp contrast to the dull monotone hospital gown. “Oh you betcha, doc,” he smiled. Our daily stroll entailed …

Lectures

Open Letter to Senator Jack Reed

This article is part of the series:

Argenis Hurtado Moreno
Providence, RI 02912
June 22, 2020

Jack Reed
Senator of Rhode Island
728 Hart Senate Office Building
Washington, DC 20510

Dear Senator Reed,

Thursday was an important and necessary victory for DACA recipients. The Supreme Court ruled against Trump, expressing:

“We do not decide whether DACA or its rescission are sound policies. The wisdom of those

Lectures

Lockdowns save, lockdowns kill: Valuing life after coronashock

This article is part of the series:

The scale and severity of the coronavirus pandemic is a shock to health systems. It is a shock to economies and governments. It is also a shock to the life sciences, which were meant to anticipate a pandemic of this magnitude, but failed to do so. The “life sciences” in question are virology, epidemiology, biomedicine and pharmacology. But the social, …

Lectures

Our COVID Museum: Notes from Physician-Anthropologists on the Frontlines of an Evolving Pandemic in Seattle and New York City

This article is part of the series:

As the pandemic of SARS-CoV2 (the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19) unfolds it continues to impact contemporary forms of sociality and community, health, care, governance, and global interconnectedness. These changes and the myriad challenges they pose are critical fodder for anthropologists of health and medicine, and we are called upon now to document lived experiences, reflexively use social theory and …