Web Roundups

Web Roundup: Public Health

I assume everyone is, like me, tired of (and stressed out about) the US election, so let’s take a break from that to take a quick look around at some interesting recent public health stories.

According to data released last month by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington, the maternal mortality rate in the

Features

Storage and stockpiling as techniques of preparedness: Managing the bottlenecks of flu pandemics

This article is part of the series:

In the last twenty years, influenza has been considered by global health experts as a model for the emergence of new pathogens from animal reservoirs. In the logic of zoonoses, human disease is the tip of the iceberg constituted by a wide circulation of viruses – often asymptomatic – in animals; it is often described as an “evolutionary dead-end”. As …

Books

When Risk, Doubt, and Difference Converge: A Review Essay

On Immunity: An Inoculation
By Eula Biss
Graywolf Press, 2014, 205 pp.

The End of Normal: Identity in a Biocultural Era
By Lennard J. Davis
University of Michigan Press, 2013, 155 pp.

Autism and Gender: From Refrigerator Mothers to Computer Geeks
By Jordynn Jack
University of Illinois Press, 2014, 306 pp.

 

Disability themes have become an increasingly central figure …

Web Roundups

Monthly Web Round-Up

On July 20th the food crisis in the Horn of Africa was officially declared a famine. In David Keen’s 1994 book The Benefits of Famine he argues that famines are “naturalised” as “disasters”, and that this naturalisation obscures the processes which cause hunger, the “identifiable forces within the province of rational human control” Susan George wrote of in her 1974 …

Features

A report on the 2010 4S conference in Tokyo

Contributed by Talia Weiner (University of Chicago)

The Society for Social Studies of Science (4S) conference this August was not just a site of interdisciplinary and cross-cultural scholarly exchange, or a good excuse to plan a trip to Japan.  It offered, in the almost endearingly undertheorized words of the Society’s online Annual Meeting announcement, no less than “a chance …