Books

Book review: Traces of the Future: An Archaeology of Medical Science in Africa

9781783207251Traces of the Future: An Archaeology of Medical Science in Africa

Paul Wenzel Geissler, Guillaume Lachenal, John Manton, and Noémi Tousignant, editors

Intellect Ltd./University of Chicago Press, 2016, 256 pages, 500 color plates

 

The first reaction to an encounter with Traces of the Future: An Archaeology of Medical Science in Africa is likely to be …

Web Roundups

Web Roundup: Photography and Visual Tech

This month’s Web Roundup is focused loosely around the theme of the visual. How do we use photography and other mediums to tell stories, and what stories do those technologies tell about us?

The New York Times Magazine did a feature on travel photography, called Voyages. The online version of the 6 highlighted pieces is both interesting and visually …

Features

Comics and the Medical Encounter

This article is part of the series:

Editor’s Note: In March of 2013 the Annals of Internal Medicine added the Graphic Medicine series as part of their medical humanities features. As they describe, “Annals Graphic Medicine brings together original graphic narratives, comics, animation/feature, and other creative forms by those who provide or receive health care.” Most often the stories are from a physician’s own experiences and

Announcements

Conference: Comics & Medicine, From Private Lives to Public Health, June 26-28, 2014

Comics & Medicine: From Private Lives to Public Health

June 26th to 28th, 2014

The Johns Hopkins Medical Campus, Baltimore, Maryland, USA

Keynote Speakers: Ellen Forney, Arthur W. Frank, James Sturm & Carol Tilley

The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Department of Art as Applied to Medicine in collaboration with Graphic Medicine invites papers for the fifth Comics & …

Books

Top of the heap: Sherine Hamdy

This article is part of the series:

This week Sherine Hamdy, Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Brown University, takes “Top of the heap” readers into the field of “graphic medicine.”

 

Sherine Hamdy

I’ve only recently come to learn about the growing field of “graphic medicine” – graphic novels and comics that explore medicine from a personal perspective. There are a few annual conferences, and a website …